4-Color to 35-Millimeter: V for Vendetta

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A mid-1980s science fictional allegory of Margaret Thatcher’s UK in comic book form is adapted into a mid-2000s science fictional allegory of George W. Bush’s U.S. in movie form. The great superhero movie rewatch remembers, remembers the 5th of November with V for Vendetta.

An excerpt:

Most important, though, is that in the movie, Evey is an actual worthwhile character. The Evey of the comic was a caricature at best, a victim of V’s manipulations. Her transformation at the end didn’t feel earned because there wasn’t anything there in the first place. The comics’ Evey is so pathetic that it seems V picked her precisely because she was so vapid, so mindless, so useless that he could easily imprint on her and give her the Stockholm Syndrome she needed to be his successor/symbol/protogée.

Natalie Portman’s Evey, though, actually has some agency. She feels like a worthy person for V to take under his cape, as it were. V’s “freeing” her via torture still comes across as horrendous, and something that mostly proves that V is no kind of hero.

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