autographed books for sale!

I’ve got a whole mess of my books for sale, and I’m more than happy to not only sell and ship them to you, but autograph them as well!

If you want any of the titles below, all you have to do is tally up the cover prices, add $5 for shipping in the U.S. (if you want shipping to a foreign country, just send me the cover prices and I’ll bill you for the postage once I know how much it is), and then send me the money, which you can do any number of ways:

  • PayPal to krad@whysper.net
  • Venmo to @keith_decandido
  • Zelle to krad@whysper.net
  • Check or money order mailed to me at PO Box 4976, New York, NY 10185-4976

Let me know your shipping address and to whom you want the book autographed. If you have any questions, comment on this blog post or e-mail me at krad@whysper.net.

Also please bear in mind that I’ve got limited quantities of some of these titles, so don’t wait too long…..

Here’s what I got:

The Precinct books

  • Dragon Precinct — $15
  • Unicorn Precinct — $15
  • Goblin Precinct — $15
  • Gryphon Precinct — $15
  • Mermaid Precinct — $15
  • Tales from Dragon Precinct — $15
  • any 3 of the above Precinct books — $40
  • any 4 of the above Precinct books — $55
  • any 5 of the above Precinct books — $65
  • all 6 of the above Precinct books — $80
  • Mermaid Precinct signed & numbered hardcover — $75

The Bram Gold Adventures

  • A Furnace Sealed — $15

The 18th Race

  • To Hell and Regroup — $15

Collections

  • Ragnarok and Roll: Tales of Cassie Zukav, Weirdness Magnet — $17
  • Without a License: The Fantastic Worlds of Keith R.A. DeCandido — $15

Anthologies

  • Bad Ass Moms (with “Materfamilias”) — $16
  • Did You Say Chicks!? hardcover (with “A Bone to Pick”) — $20
  • Pangaea Book 3: Redemption (with “Journalistic Integrity”) — $16

Alien tie-ins

  • Bug Hunt (with “Deep Background”) — $17
  • Isolation paperback — $8
  • Isolation audio CD — $20

Marvel tie-ins

  • Spider-Man: Down These Mean Streets — $10
  • Spider-Man: Venom’s Wrath — $10
  • Thor: Dueling with Giants — $10
  • X-Men Legends (with “Diary of a False Man”) — $20

Star Trek tie-ins

  • The Art of the Impossible — $8
  • The Klingon Art of War — $25
  • Myriad Universes: Echoes and Refractions (with A Gutted World) — $15
  • Seven Deadly Sins (with “The Unhappy Ones”) — $15
  • A Singular Destiny — $8
  • Tales of the Dominion War — $24 SOLD OUT
  • A Time for War, a Time for Peace — $8 SOLD OUT

Young Hercules tie-ins

  • The Ares Alliance — $3
  • Cheiron’s Warriors — $3
  • both YH books — $5

Other tie-ins

  • Command and Conquer: Tiberium Wars — $5
  • Farscape: House of Cards — $10
  • Gene Roddenberry’s Andromeda: Destruction of Illusions hardcover — $10
  • Serenity — $10
  • Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution — $8
  • Supernatural: Heart of the Dragon — $8

read my stuff while you’re stuck at home, part 3: movie tie-ins

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So many of us are kinda stuck staying home a lot, and that means more reading time! Or, at least, time spent reading so you don’t go batshit because you’re stuck staying at home a lot……

As one possible thing to read, how about my writing? I’ve already posted about my various TV tie-ins, including my Star Trek work and my tie-ins to various and sundry other shows, and now we turn to my movie tie-ins. I’ve written both original novels and movie novelizations, as well as short stories and nonfiction, in the worlds of Alien, Blade Runner, Cars, Gargantua, Darkness Falls, King Kong, Kung Fu Panda, Mary Shelley, Night of the Living Dead, Resident Evil, Serenity, and Star Wars.

Alien

Novels:

  • Isolation — a novelization of the 2014 videogame, taking place between Alien and Aliens as Amanda Ripley, Ellen’s daughter, tries to find out what happened to her Mom by traveling to Sevastapol Station where the Nostromo flight recorder has been recovered

Short stories:

  • “Deep Background” in Bug Hunt — a reporter is embedded with a platoon of Colonial Marines, who are sent to a planet for what should be a straightforward mission…

Blade Runner

Nonfiction:

  • “Do Blades Dream of Electric Runners?” in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? — each issue of BOOM! Studios’s comic book version of the Philip K. Dick novella had an essay in the back, and mine was in issue #19 and is reprinted along with all the others in the omnibus; I talk about the comparison between the novella and the cult classic movie based on it

Cars

Comic books:

  • Rust Bucket Derby — Tow Mater starts up a demolition derby and Red goes on trial for a crime he didn’t commit

Darkness Falls

Novels:

  • Darkness Falls — novelization of the 2003 horror film about the secret origin of the Tooth Fairy, who preys on children and adults alike

Gargantua

Novels:

  • Gargantua (as K. Robert Andreassi) — novelization of the 1998 TV movie about a family of monsters who menace a tropical island

King Kong

Nonfiction:

  • “‘Twas Stupidity Killed the Beast” in King Kong is Back! — my essay on how it wasn’t beauty that killed the beast, as the famous closing line of King Kong insists, but rather human venality

Kung Fu Panda

Comic books:

  • “Contest of Chompions” in Tales of the Dragon Warrior #1 — an eating contest and a fighting contest are at the same time, and Po must somehow participate in both

Mary Shelley

Nonfiction:

Night of the Living Dead

Short stories:

  • “Live and On the Scene” in Nights of the Living Dead — during the zombie outbreak of the movie, a reporter from WIC-TV in Pittsburgh reports on the strange deaths, which start to hit very close to home

Resident Evil

Novels:

  • Genesis — a novelization of the 2001 movie Resident Evil (given the subtitle to distinguish it from the sequels), released in 2004 alongside the novelization of its sequel Apocalypse, as Alice Abernathy must remember who she is while trying to survive multiple deathtraps and a whole lotta zombies
  • Apocalypse — a novelization of the 2004 sequel, where the zombies take over Raccoon City, and Alice and several new friends must stop them, as well as the creature Nemesis
  • Extinction — a novelization of the 2007 movie, where the world is a wasteland, overrun by the undead, and Alice teams up with a group of survivors to stop the Umbrella Corporation from making things worse

Serenity (Firefly)

Novels:

  • Serenity — the novelization of the 2005 movie that concluded the River Tam storyline from the Firefly TV series

Nonfiction:

Games:

Star Wars

Nonfiction:

nifty article on Alien fiction!

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Jessica Avery has written a most nifty article on Book Riot about Alien novels. She discusses everything from the various movie novelizations by Alan Dean Foster and A.C. Crispin, as well as the recent YA book by Mira Grant, plus she has detailed interviews with three recent Alien word-slingers: Tim Lebbon, the author of Out of the Shadows and the Rage War trilogy, Scott Sigler, the author of the new Legion novel, and me, the author of last year’s Isolation. (In addition, all three of us contributed to Jonathan Maberry’s 2017 Aliens anthology Bug Hunt.)

Here’s an excerpt:

Aside from the joys and challenges of writing within an existing canon, and how to find the story you want to tell, I also wanted to know, with so many stories already being told, were there prior works in the franchise that particularly inspired you? And because your work cannot exist in a vacuum, separate from the rest of the canon, how do your works then come to be in conversations with all the novels that have come before you? Obviously Lebbon, Sigler, and DeCandido are all Alien fans from way back, influenced by the films that made such strong first impressions. All three agreed that Alien, Aliens, or both were their favorite films of the franchise (not surprising given how many fans feel about the later films, she says sliding her beloved copies of Alien 3Alien: Resurrection, and the prequels under the couch), acknowledging the influence of Aliens‘s action-adventure storyline, and what Keith DeCandido referred to as Alien‘s “portrayal of Space Longshoremen on a battered, broken-down old ship, which provided the template for this rather dank future,” which set the stage for everything that followed.

Check it out!

 

a great review of Alien: Isolation

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Every once in a while, as an author you get a review that makes you punch the air and say, “Yes! They got it! Woo!”

This is one such: Amy Walker of the Trans Scribe book review blog reviewed Alien: Isolation, and she totally got what I was going for.

An excerpt:

Decandido doesn’t just build this new backstory, but has the difficult job of condensing down the whole game-play scenario into a story that wont leave readers bored. Whilst walking through countless corridors for hours on end worked for the game, thanks in large part to the massive levels of tension the game built, it wasn’t going to make an entertaining read. Thankfully, the books narrative is able to capture a lot of this atmosphere, and hits all of the major beats of the game.

This doesn’t just include the big story moments, which of course would be included, but little things like the scrawled graffiti players find on the walls, Amanda making smoke-bombs out of scrap materials, and having to collect tools to progress through the station. Sometimes game adaptations can feel like poor novels as the writers work hard to include as much of the game-play experience as they can. I found this to be true in the Resident Evil novel series, where the game adaptations were not quite as good as the stories that the writer was able to craft themselves. Thankfully, this kind of thing didn’t happen here, largely thanks to the inclusion of all of the backstory segments.

happy book birthday to Alien: Isolation!

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Today is the official on-sale date for Alien: Isolation! Taking place between Alien and Aliens, Isolation is the story of Amanda Ripley, Ellen’s daughter, a 25-year-old technician who is trying to find out what happened to her mother, who went missing on the Nostromo fifteen years earlier. A lead takes her to Sevastopol Station, but while the station holds Ripley’s secrets, it also holds a Xenomorph that is determined to kill everything in its path…

Based on the 2014 videogame, my novel also includes detailed backstory on both Ellen and Amanda Ripley, giving the background of one of the most compelling heroes of science fiction film.

The book is out in mass-market paperback and eBook, and it should be available at your local bookstore, and also online from the usual book purveyors: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Indie Bound, Kobo, Powell’s, or Forbidden Planet. There is also an audiobook available for preorder — it’ll be released on the 13th of August. EDITED TO ADD: The audio is now available, too!

Happy book birthday to me!

a very nice review of Alien: Isolation

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Over at The Dream Cage, Alwyn Ash has written a very nice review of my forthcoming Alien novel Isolation (which goes on sale Tuesday). This is the first review I’ve seen of the book, and it makes me very very happy. Check it out!

An excerpt:

Author Keith DeCandido, who has written a plethora of sci-fi works including media tie-in books such as Star Trek as well as his own fiction, was tasked to adapt the game. Titan Books couldn’t have chosen a better writer. What you get with Alien Isolation the novel is a lot more than just a mirror image of someone else’s work, he literally adds depth to the back story of Amanda Ripley. We get to see her childhood, and the moment when she had to say goodbye to Ellen before that ill-fated trip aboard the Nostromo. DeCandido also includes a scene one month before her eleventh birthday when her stepfather Paul gets the news that the Nostromo is being declared “missing in action”.

SYFY Wire has an Alien: Isolation interview and excerpt!

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SYFY Wire has an exclusive excerpt from Alien: Isolation up, as well as a brief interview with me. 

An excerpt from the interview:

This is DeCandido’s second story for the Alien franchise, having previously written a story for the 2017 anthology Bug Hunt, “Deep Background.” He views the appeal of both Ellen and Amanda Ripley in that they’re both strong, smart characters.

“Someone on Twitter recently described ALIEN as (and I’m paraphrasing here), ‘Nobody listens to the smart woman and then everyone dies except for the smart woman and her cat.’ One of the most appealing aspects of Ellen Ripley is that she cuts through the nonsense. ‘Nuke it from orbit, it’s the only way to be sure’ is one of the greatest moments in any action movie. Amanda is cut from the same cloth, with the added bonus that she’s a brilliant engineer.”

Check out the whole thing, plus a bit from Chapter 10 of the novel.